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    Welcome to

    Jabirr Jabirr Country

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    Catch & Cook

    Experience

     

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    Experience Saltwater

    Culture

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An Amazing  Cultural Exchange

Join Jabirr Jabirr, Ngumbarl man Jayden Howard on a cultural tagalong tour through the spectacular coastal country of the Dampier Peninsula. Travel along dirt tracks and explore remote, white, sandy beaches, fresh water springs and amazing mangrove ecosystems and secret fishing locations.

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Saltwater People

The Dampier Peninsula is the traditional lands of seven Aboriginal language groups. The area around Carnot Bay is Jabirr Jabirr, Ngarmul Country. Learn about the traditional lives of the saltwater people, the seasons that we lived by and how this country provided for our ancestors and how they in turn, took care of Country.

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Low Tide Tour

After a moderate 1km walk . Along the way, fish for Mangrove Jack and Barramundi, learn about traditional hunter gathering techniques including thrownet fishing and spearfishing. We finish at a sheltered camp site, where we cook up the catch of the day and enjoy cold drinks and freshly made sandwiches .
 

About This Tour

Explore

Carnot Bay

with a Local

Growing up in the area, Jaden spent his time fishing and exploring the mangroves. Fishing with local knowledge all but gurarantees you’ll come away with a catch. Join Jaden on tour as he shares his favourite locations and fishing spots with you.

 

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Forage for Bushfoods

Explore the mangroves on foot in search of mudshells, bombshells and mudcrabs and hopefully some fish species. Learn about the six seasons and how to identify important bushfoods and medicine plants. Share traditional survival skills and hear about local history and Jabirr Jabirr Dreaming stories connected to the area.

 

Enquire about this tour

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When WWII came to Carnot Bay

Hear the story of the Dutch plane that crash landed at Carnot Bay during WWII and the precious cargo of diamonds it was carrying. The story goes that only some of the $20million worth of diamonds made it back to authorities. What happened to the rest is the stuff of local legend.